Dr. Omar Guerrero

The Alan Turing Institute, UK

Areas of expertise

  • Economics, Complexity Science and Data Science
  • Computational modelling (agent-based models, network theory)
  • Public policy analysis

Education

  • Ph.D in Computational Social Science, George Mason University, USA
  • M.Sc. in Computational Economics and Finance, University of Essex, UK
  • B.A. in Economics, Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education (ITESM), Mexico

Omar is a Senior Research Fellow at the Department of Economics in University College London and an ESRC-Turing fellow at The Alan Turing Institute, the UK's national institute for Data Science and Artificial Intelligence (AI).

His research interest lies in the intersection of Economics, Complexity Science and Data Science; being his most recent contribution the Policy Priority Inference (PPI) for the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).

His main research focus involves a variety of socioeconomic-related topics such as labour and firm dynamics; detecting vote-trading behaviour in legislatures; modelling how governments determine policy priorities, and measuring the impact of housing market policies. More generally, he is interested in advancing computational social science by developing methods and models that can inform both academics and policymakers.

Omar has extensive expertise in employing methods from fields such as agent-computing, network science, and machine learning. He has published in renowned academic journals and featured in media outlets such as Wired Magazine and the MIT Tech Review. He also has advised organisations such as the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), the UNDP, and the UK Department for Business, Energy, and Industrial Strategy (BEIS).

He is a fellow at the prestigious think tank of inequality studies Centro de Estudios Espinosa Yglesias and external faculty at the Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education, both institutions located in Mexico City. Previously, he was a research fellow at the Saïd Business School (Oxford) and an Oxford Martin Fellow at the Institute for New Economic Thinking; as well as a visiting scholar at the Department of Computer Science of Aalto University in Finland.